Officer, arrest that ISP

28 06 2009

I got a postcard in the mail the other day from Rogers, telling me that I had gotten a free speed upgrade on my high-speed internet. According to them, my surfing speed has been increased from 7Mbps to 10Mpbs. Mind you, I haven’t noticed any difference, but I was happy with the rate I had already, so it’s all good.

According to Rogers, here are the benefits of my new zippity-fast rate:

  • I can now download a 5MB song in four seconds – two seconds faster than before.
  • I can now download a 60MB movie trailer in 50 seconds instead of 71.
  • I can now download a 700MB movie in 9.5 minutes.

You may have noticed a common theme here: the primary benefit of a faster rate, according to them, is all about the downloading. They even refer to the connection speed as “download speed” in the postcard.

Now, whack me upside the head with a heavy sock if I’m wrong. But, unless they’re naively assuming that all their customers are using their new blazing fast download speed to access legal download sites, aren’t they basically encouraging copyright violation in their advertising? I guess they’re assuming that everybody downloads nowadays.

(By the way, the Internet hasn’t changed things all that much. When I was a kid, virtually everybody I know was using cassettes to copy each other’s music, and was swiping milk cartons from grocery stores to put their records in.)

What’s most frustrating for me about all this: much of the music I want to listen to nowadays – stuff that I would actually pay real money to buy – isn’t available for either sale or downloading. Does anybody know where I can get a copy of The Methadones’ “21st Century Power Pop Riot” or “The Original Labour of Love Collection (25 Trojan Reggae Classics)”?

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5 responses

28 06 2009
Rob

“By the way, the Internet hasn’t changed things all that much. When I was a kid, virtually everybody I know was using cassettes to copy each other’s music, and was swiping milk cartons from grocery stores to put their records in.”

I was with you until you mentioned putting records in milk cartons. Records = big round discs, right? I really don’t get it. Were milk cartons a different size back then?

To put this in context, I’m more confused than the time you didn’t understand what “Mill Street was just off the hook” meant.

29 06 2009
davetill

I’m not sure whether “milk carton” is the right term, but I was referring to those large plastic cube-shaped boxes that dairy companies use to ship their milk products in. When I was a teenager, these were just about exactly the same width as an LP cover.

Just about everybody I knew had one or more of these to store their LPs in. I don’t have anything to play LPs on right now, but I still have two milk cartons full of them.

Sometime in the 1980s, dairy companies changed the size of these plastic storage cubes, and they stopped being large enough to hold LPs.

29 06 2009
Rob

Oh, milk *crates*! Well, now I’m up to speed. That makes much more sense.

A milk carton, to me, holds two litres of milk and fits on the top shelf of your fridge. This may be generational (they probably had milk bottles in your day, Chet).

Of course, now we have milk *bags*. Who came up with all these various containers for storing milk?

29 06 2009
Rob

Damnit, now I really want some milk.

29 06 2009
davetill

Crate! That’s the word I was looking for!

We didn’t have milk bottles when I was a kid – though the house I grew up in (which was built in 1960) had a place to put them. We had returnable three-quart milk jugs, which stores stopped selling because people were doing things like storing transmission fluid in them before returning them.

(You can still see a lot of old variety store signs advertising that they sell “jug milk”.)

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